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Friday, July 08, 2011

Whisky: A popular cheer in down times

Consumers in Lebanon shift away from the brash high-end

Executive magazine

With sales down in bars, restaurants and hotels, the less glamorous supermarket has become an important outlet for whisky brands


Amid the current economic recession, there has been a general downward shift from luxury spirits to medium-priced bottles, while most distributors have put the launch of new brands on hold. With competition getting tougher, brands are working on revamping their image to appeal to the high-end drinker, while distributors are still paying eye-watering sums to get exclusive rights at the capital’s premier nightspots.


“The market always strives to go upwards, but it has been a difficult year globally and in the Middle East, and it is maybe not the right time to introduce new brands,” said Wadih Riachi, cellar manager at Vintage in downtown Beirut. “Yet the drinks sector has not reached a critical mass in Lebanon, by far, in terms of new products, spirits and packaging.”


The spirits segment has developed over the past few years, evident in the rise in premium vodkas, gins, brandies, rums and tequilas on offer. Vodka sales grew by up to 4 percent over the past year, above the 120,000 cases benchmark, but Lebanon is still very much a whisky market, with more than 450,000 cases imported every year.


It is in whiskies that there has been a maturing of the segment, with tipplers increasingly opting for single malts instead of reaching for the ubiquitous Johnny Walker Black Label. “Knowledge about single malts really started last year; we’re on the right track,” said Paul Atallah, wine and bar manager at Le Gray Hotel. “I think single malts will boom, and it is a great match with cigars,” he added.


Hipnotic


Currently, imported fine and single malt whiskies average more than 8,000 cases per year, far more than cognac, at around 1,000 cases. Of those 8,000 cases, an estimated 70 percent are the 12 and 15-year-old single malts.


To differentiate the malts from the mass whisky market, companies are working on packaging. For instance, Glenfiddich, the biggest selling single malt label in the world, realized that the packaging for its 21 and 30-year-old malts being the same as the significantly cheaper 12 and 15-year-old malts was detrimental to sales.


To make these older and super premium malts stand out, Glenfiddich got rid of the cardboard tubes in favor of wooden boxes, first for the 30-year malt and later this year for the 21-year. There has been a corresponding 15 to 20 percent rise in the price, but the brand is banking on the improved aesthetic appeal.


The bottle has also changed, along with specific numbering on the labels, which has an appeal to collectors. “Some people want special numbers, such as one customer asking for the ‘600’, for example,” said Vintage’s Riachi.


Glenfiddich’s re-packaging seems to have worked. Vintage typically sold one to two bottles of the 30-year malt a month, but after the makeover they sold two cases in three days. “They got it right,” said Riachi.


Outlets are also emphasizing the range of whiskies a distillery offers. “People like collecting whisky in the same way as wine; instead of a 2001 or 2003 vintage it is a 12, 15, 17, 21 or 30-year-old malt. You drink less but better. And that is the magic of spirits; wine is drunk immediately [after opening], but spirits keep for ages,” added Riachi.


Rising from the snow


Rare malts and varieties from specific years are also proving attractive.

“Scarcity is the best salesman of wine or spirits,” said Riachi. The Camus 1971 Armagnac, for instance, is likely to sell well this year as a lot of people will be turning 40. And in terms of a unique drinking experience, one of the most sought after this year by whisky connoisseurs is Glenfiddich’s Snow Phoenix.


The Snow Phoenix is a one-off combination of single malts that came about following heavy snowfall at Glenfiddich’s distillery in the Scottish Highlands in January 2010 that caused some warehouse roofs to collapse. With casks exposed to sub-zero conditions, the master distiller decided to bring together the whiskies from ex-bourbon and Oloroso casks that had aged for 13 to 30 years into a non-aged single malt. It is now being hailed as a cult malt; some websites selling the Snow Phoenix have already sold out, while in Lebanon only 250 bottles are to be available for sale and half have already been pre-ordered ahead of the July launch.


The region’s window display


With the summer season not expected to be as dynamic as in years past due to a dearth of tourists, and Ramadan falling in August, drinks sales are expected to be down. But Lebanon still remains a top venue for marketing spirits, from the low to the premium level.


“Lebanon has become a Club Med destination, with two seasons, and the rest of the year having to survive on the Lebanese,” said Carlo Vincenti of Vincenti & Sons, distributor of St. James, Label 5, Glen Moray and Pitu Cachaca. “Lebanon is a window display for the whole region, as a big percentage of the profits from spirits sales in the United Arab Emirates and Saudi Arabia is spent on marketing in Lebanon.” Surprising though it may seem, Saudi Arabia is unofficially the fifth largest whisky market in the world.


Marketing is evident at Beirut’s infamous Sky Bar, where distributors have been spending ever-increasing sums over the past three years to target trendsetters. This year, according to distributors, some $630,000 was spent by Diageo for exclusive rights to sell its brands and by distributor Etablissements Antoine Massoud to plug its Russian Standard vodka at the rooftop bar.


“It is ridiculous, but more outlets are asking for money in advance to exclusively sell alcohol brands, despite the downturn,” said Nagi Hmouda, business manager at Fattal, distributor of Dewar’s, Grey Goose and Patron. “We are skeptical about the season as a lot of losses will be incurred.”


Fattal will not be introducing any new brands this year. Vincenti has launched the premium cognac Bisquit, but is focusing on faster moving spirits such as cachaca — the fastest growing spirits category in the world — rum and vodka.


Yet Vincenti also expects the upward swing in vodka to tail off. “Vodka was a discovery drink and many new brands were introduced to the market, but I think people will shift back to something less neutral in terms of taste, to whisky, rum and tequila, which are taking off.”


With sales down in on-trade — at bars, restaurants and hotels — the less glamorous supermarket has become an important point of sale. Indeed, supermarkets are now charging higher listing fees and investments to display brands.


“High-end brands are on supermarket shelves, but in terms of shelf off-take it is very weak,” said Vincenti. “Such brands shouldn’t be there as the consumers are not the type of people that go to supermarkets. There is a question mark on prestige if a bottle is on a supermarket shelf for months.” The supermarket as a high-end spirit venue may constrain the launching of new products and curb rise in consumption of single malts.


“Demand for single malts has risen over the last two years but I’m not sure it can go on. If on-trade doesn’t evolve, launching luxury spirits will not succeed. You can’t launch a 16-year old whisky in a supermarket, and you can’t sell more than one case per month,” said Vincenti. “But the downturn is not necessarily a bad thing. Lebanon was living in an imaginary world, as you never saw anyone in Europe paying $400 for a bottle in a club. It wasn’t healthy.”


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